Student Progress Report Interpretation Flagstaff AZ

For years, school administrators and parents (and some students) have been arguing about the relevance and significance of a child’s student progress report and school report card. Essentially, this means people are now questioning if school grades still hold any importance today, and if they can still (if they ever did) accurately measure the actual skill and intelligence of a student.

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Student Progress Report Interpretation

For years, school administrators and parents (and some students) have been arguing about the relevance and significance of a child’s student progress report and school report card. Essentially, this means people are now questioning if school grades still hold any importance today, and if they can still (if they ever did) accurately measure the actual skill and intelligence of a student. In terms of children academic performance, of course, a student progress report still does what it should—it reflects academic performance according to the standards and procedures of the school. But what people are asking now is if these academic performance measures hold any significance beyond the academe. Is a student with amazing academic performance really prepared to face the real world? Are good grades really the measure of intelligence and ability?

With all these current considerations, you should also reassess how you evaluate your child’s student progress report.

Progress reports

Although it may differ in some areas and countries, progress reports are, obviously, reports given to students (and consequently their parents) to inform them about their academic performance during the middle part of a term. Hence, progress reports are a reflection of academic performance thus far. This is essential for high school students, who usually have two terms per year. In order to properly assess their performance before the end of term, schools give the progress reports, as some sort of affirmation of good performance or a warning for bad academic performance. Therefore, the student can exert more effort if they are failing.

Approaching the progress report

Because a progress report is not final, parents may have some difficulty with confronting their child about it. While it’s not final and can certainly improve, poor academic performance as stated on the progress report does say he or she hasn’t been doing quite well so far. Will the child deserve reproach and publish, or should the parent wait until the final grades arrive?

Needless to say, bad performance means there is a need for change. Bad performance requires action, to be sure, but a bad academic performance as reflected by progress reports will definitely deserve a second chance. Use the student progress report as a guide—not an indicator whether to punish the child for his bad grades or not.

Use the student progress report as a means to determine problem areas. So your child as bad grades, but what would you do about it? At this point, it is more important to find out the answer to one seemingly easy question: why? Furthermore, what can you do about it? If you do not address these questions, the student progress report becomes useless. What’s the point of knowing your child’s performance midway if you’re not going to do anything about it?

Evaluating on grades and academic performance

Interpreting the grades seems easy; after all, isn’t it only a matter of checking whether the grade is high or low? But with the concerns and issues raised earlier about the real measure of skill and intelligence, it may be necessary to reevaluate your interpretation.

For instance, experts believe that you should focus first (not more) on the positives. What did you child do right? Progress reports usually have teachers’ comments about things beyond grades in areas such as socialization, responsibility, or effort. If the teachers made positive comments about your child despite the high grades, commend your child first by saying you commend him or her for the positive teacher response. This will make your criticism about your child’s bad grades easier to digest. Otherwise, the child may think that you’re only emphasizing the negative aspects of his performance and that you will only emphasize the negative aspects of his academic performance regardless how well he does in school.

Others also say that your evaluation should not focus on the grades alone. Rather, consider, too, the effort he or she is exerting, or what your child is doing to improve his or her academic performance. Remember that your child is not perfect, and you should not expect your child to be perfect. Therefore, expecting your child to have very high grades for all the subjects may not be realistic—and healthy. Consider your child’s strengths and weaknesses, and compare them vis a vis the effort exerted to improve. In this case, if you saw your child do everything he or she could to have high grades in the problem areas, it should be commended. If the improvement was minimal yet there, it should be commended. Try to make your child do the best that he or she can, but not so much that it’s already suffocating her.

Remember that grades are just grades; consider them accordingly. More than a measure of academic performance, student progress reports are also gauges for improvement and effort, especially when you use it to compare with the actual term grades.

Acting on the children academic performance

Once you know how to evaluate the progress report, you need to know how to act on it. Basically, as mentioned above, you need to act on it by trying to see problem areas and by trying to find out what is wrong. Perhaps you can ask if there are certain subjects your child finds too difficult. Does your child need help with these academic areas, or do you think the problem can be solved with a little effort? Ask him or her if there are classroom situations and factors that could be the cause for the low grades. Are his or her classmates bullying him? Is the pace of the discussion too far? Are there any problems that hinder his or her studies?

Once you have settled these issues, you can work on the action plan to improve the children academic performance. Never dictate action without the previous considerations; you should always put everything in context. If you do not, you risk being unjust and unfair. Bad grades are bad grades, to be sure, but bad grades also have reasons. Once you have ironed out the problems beyond the academics, then you can speak to your child about improvement.